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BlackRock tells black rocks to kick rocks. BlackRock, the world's biggest asset manager, has announced that it will divest from thermal coal projects and gear future investments toward helping to solve climate change.

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  • Another step in the right direction for encouraging sustainability within corporate America and beyond. Creating a sustainable path forward for our communities, our environment, and our people demands collaboration and transparency to improve society and stabilize conditions for the future

  • I genuinely believe/hope we will someday look back at this time and see that it was the tipping point for when sustainable investing was finally ready to go mainstream. Making that kind of change, the kind that seemed so impossible at the outset, is perhaps the most important function of leadership.

  • If the Inevitable Policy Response predicted to hit capital market happens, this will be seen as the tip of a fast-melting iceberg. The IPR prediction (https://www.unpri.org/inevitable-policy-response/what-is-the-inevitable-policy-response/4787.article) posits "financial markets today have not adequately

    If the Inevitable Policy Response predicted to hit capital market happens, this will be seen as the tip of a fast-melting iceberg. The IPR prediction (https://www.unpri.org/inevitable-policy-response/what-is-the-inevitable-policy-response/4787.article) posits "financial markets today have not adequately priced-in the likely near-term policy response to climate change." When governments start implementing their stated plans to cut emissions in line with the Paris accords, billions of dollars of market value will be wiped out. Companies and investors will wake up to realize that their main assets (power plants, mines, gas and coal reserves) are liabilities in a world facing massive, debilitating warming and instability. Of course, we'll see what BlackRock does, but the writing is on the wall.

  • This is good for business, and a structural market imperative. Those that do not follow this lead will become less competitive, and then non-competitive. Investing in climate pollution has long been classed by economists as “destructive spending”, because it creates conditions like we are witnessing

    This is good for business, and a structural market imperative. Those that do not follow this lead will become less competitive, and then non-competitive. Investing in climate pollution has long been classed by economists as “destructive spending”, because it creates conditions like we are witnessing now in Australia. The current trend, if not significantly altered, will create conditions for simultaneous prolonged drought and crop failure across multiple “breadbasket” regions in the coming decades. Climate resilient investment will define market leaders in the 2020s.

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