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We can all make better decisions about risk. In the first episode of RISK, Quartz’s new video series for members, psychologist Gerd Gigerenzer explains why most of us are “risk illiterate” and how, precisely, we can change that. ✦

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  • I like the 'frequency' approach presented here. I had previously been introduced to the breast cancer question while trying (..vainly!...) to teach myself Bayesian probability. Obviously, both approaches end up with the same result, but the graphic representing frequency is FAR simpler to grasp quickly

    I like the 'frequency' approach presented here. I had previously been introduced to the breast cancer question while trying (..vainly!...) to teach myself Bayesian probability. Obviously, both approaches end up with the same result, but the graphic representing frequency is FAR simpler to grasp quickly and internalize. Looking forward to the remaining videos in this series.

  • The word "risk" is rooted in danger. But in practice, it's mostly a good thing. That's the underlying premise of our new show, RISK. This first episode took us to the world's first Center for Risk Literacy in Berlin and the flagship site of a now defunct criminal consumer electronics empire in New York

    The word "risk" is rooted in danger. But in practice, it's mostly a good thing. That's the underlying premise of our new show, RISK. This first episode took us to the world's first Center for Risk Literacy in Berlin and the flagship site of a now defunct criminal consumer electronics empire in New York. In my research, I was most surprised to learn that the smallest shift in the way we present information can have life-or-death consequences– and that it's not common knowledge. I'm interested to hear any questions this video prompted, as well as what you'd like to see more of in all of our future shows.

  • It’s great to see Risk Literacy being taught to key professions such as Doctors. I would be interested to hear more about how it is being taught to children too!

  • 1. Risks aren't always bad.

    2. Knowing both the good and bad risks can help us achieve the former in decision-making situations.

    3. Before you can even navigate through risk, you should fully understand its background and be able to digest it using frequencies and prerefarably not by confusing percentages.

  • Having worked for many years in healthcare this is very helpful for patients to understand side effects. I wonder if anti-vaccination myths would have been so widespread if risk was better understood.

    Now I work in influence and understand very well the impact that the way a proposal is packaged can

    Having worked for many years in healthcare this is very helpful for patients to understand side effects. I wonder if anti-vaccination myths would have been so widespread if risk was better understood.

    Now I work in influence and understand very well the impact that the way a proposal is packaged can affect the level of agreement. People who are afraid of risk simply need to hear it in a way that they feel comfortable with.

    Great episode

  • I thought this was outstanding. Expressing probabilities as natural frequencies should be woven into school curricula. That, along with meaningful graphics, would vastly improve people's understanding of statistical data. The ideas of Kahneman and Tversky's work have essentially created the behavioral

    I thought this was outstanding. Expressing probabilities as natural frequencies should be woven into school curricula. That, along with meaningful graphics, would vastly improve people's understanding of statistical data. The ideas of Kahneman and Tversky's work have essentially created the behavioral economics body of knowledge that is now so influential in economic thinking. No reason why this approach to risk shouldn't do the same.

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