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Gosia Herba

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Citizenship law exhaustion? Not quite yet

Kobe Bryant is dead

An Uber déjà vu?

Uber was bound to exit Indian food delivery. Uber Eats’s exit is similar to the strategy the ride-hailing giant has deployed the world over—selling off regional operations to competitors such as China’s Didi, Russia’s Yandex and Singapore’s Grab for minority stakes in each business.Quartz

If Uber’s global record is anything to go by, it was bound to exit Indian food delivery

With Uber's exit from food business, it is to be seen who reigns supreme in a business, which continues to see companies make heavy losses on every order. Players in the sector are far from reaching profitability. A competitor less may not see others cover more ground quickly. Food business is a hard

With Uber's exit from food business, it is to be seen who reigns supreme in a business, which continues to see companies make heavy losses on every order. Players in the sector are far from reaching profitability. A competitor less may not see others cover more ground quickly. Food business is a hard space to be in and requires scale and high volume for any player to make money.

Tech in the 20s

China is 👀 India’s auto market

Green transit is trendy

Lakes appearing, lakes disappearing

Monitoring coronavirus in the digital era

AI spotted the coronavirus outbreak before health officials announced it. Bluedot, a Toronto-based health monitoring startup, used machine learning to sift through news reports and airline data, correctly predicting that the disease would spread to Bangkok, Seoul, Taipei, and Tokyo.Quartz

How artificial intelligence provided early warnings of the Wuhan virus

Perfect example of #AI providing a better, faster pattern recognition & accompanying recommendations than established human power hierarchies ever could without this tool; especially in the case of epidemics where it's crucially important to react swiftly.

Data will always be power - if you have it. Imagine having data access on the movement of people, trade, and even animals around cities, provinces, countries, and continents. One can definitely predict the likelihood of an outbreak and its infection path. Loopholes can be seen and our governments can be more ready.

The popular mobile game plague inc. is being played out in real time. Like bluedot, the game too wants the players to predict and “cause” outbreaks around the globe based on air traffic, media coverage and government measures. The developer of the game does not call it a scientific model, but would you

The popular mobile game plague inc. is being played out in real time. Like bluedot, the game too wants the players to predict and “cause” outbreaks around the globe based on air traffic, media coverage and government measures. The developer of the game does not call it a scientific model, but would you be surprised if it were a similar model?

Work smarter

Don't take on too many goals at once. If you spread yourself too thin, you'll never make progress on any of your projects. Pick one goal that aligns with your long-term strategy and force yourself to work on it for a set amount of time.Harvard Business Review

Don’t Bog Yourself Down with Too Many Goals

I like Tip #4! "Force yourself to work toward the goal for a predetermined amount of time."

In other words, eliminate distraction. It’s so common for critical goals to keep getting pushed down the to-do list. You can prioritize a goal during your day by turning off distractions from coworkers, email

I like Tip #4! "Force yourself to work toward the goal for a predetermined amount of time."

In other words, eliminate distraction. It’s so common for critical goals to keep getting pushed down the to-do list. You can prioritize a goal during your day by turning off distractions from coworkers, email and social media; you can create “Zones of Focus Time” for your priorities. In my research we coined the term Micro-Resilience to describe how small changes like these make it easier to achieve big goals.

Infosys president Ravi Kumar has some tips on creating a resilient workforce. The future belongs to those who can learn to learn, learn to unlearn, and learn to relearn, Kumar says. Here are three points to ponder as we try to help the workforce learn better.Quartz

How can we create a workforce full of lifelong learners?

Problem finding / solving is inherent in the creative industries, yet so much has been made better at this point. I love the concept of ‘problem finders’ the irony is beautiful. Yet the solutions are focused on only a few industries, food, retail, transactions, most divergent thinkers seem to be applying

Problem finding / solving is inherent in the creative industries, yet so much has been made better at this point. I love the concept of ‘problem finders’ the irony is beautiful. Yet the solutions are focused on only a few industries, food, retail, transactions, most divergent thinkers seem to be applying their skills to these sectors.

As a Jeweler there is no shortage of problems in my industry to try and solve. We need more innovative lifelong learners who seek to initiate change.

Is it possible to balance competence and ethical behaviour? Most people think it’s impossible to do both. PR agency Edelman has been measuring public trust in people and institutions for the past 20 years, and the latest results are out.Quartz

Most people think it’s impossible to be both ethical and competent

We’re seeing a ramp up of the consequences of inequality in society being writ large, with the biggest trust gap between the informed public and the mass population observed to date across a record 8 markets.

Institutions are also ranked low on their ability to partner successfully with each other

We’re seeing a ramp up of the consequences of inequality in society being writ large, with the biggest trust gap between the informed public and the mass population observed to date across a record 8 markets.

Institutions are also ranked low on their ability to partner successfully with each other. The world is increasingly complex and the issues we face are increasingly global. If we have any shot of addressing issues like climate change we need strong partnerships and real collaboration between our institutions. The data shows that much work is needed to convince the public this is possible and to make this a reality

Richard Edelman refers to "Alice in Wonderland". At least with a children's story there is hope. Perhaps in my Monday mood I am overly pessimistic but I immediately thought Poe's "Masque of the Red Death " as a better description of the public perception of Davos.

It is so difficult to believe the

Richard Edelman refers to "Alice in Wonderland". At least with a children's story there is hope. Perhaps in my Monday mood I am overly pessimistic but I immediately thought Poe's "Masque of the Red Death " as a better description of the public perception of Davos.

It is so difficult to believe the public do not trust the apparent economic elites?

“National income inequality is now the more important factor in institutional trust,”

Taco Bell is paying upwards of almost six figures for branch managers to stay competitive and keep talent in the Midwest, where cost of living is lower and the gaps of income aren’t huge but still present. Almost everywhere

“National income inequality is now the more important factor in institutional trust,”

Taco Bell is paying upwards of almost six figures for branch managers to stay competitive and keep talent in the Midwest, where cost of living is lower and the gaps of income aren’t huge but still present. Almost everywhere in the world there are larger and larger gaps in pay, creating a seemingly global societal caste system.

If you break away from the ‘corporate life’ you almost dive into the pool of being underpaid for your craft and having to fight harder for your worth. The payout for many is the feeling of adding value to the greater good, making a difference, or bringing back the personal touch to our products instead of relying on next day delivery from Amazon. What will that look like in 5 years though? Or even 10?

We can all make better decisions about risk. In the first episode of RISK, Quartz’s new video series for members, psychologist Gerd Gigerenzer explains why most of us are “risk illiterate” and how, precisely, we can change that. ✦Quartz

Most of us are “risk illiterate”—but we can fix that

I like the 'frequency' approach presented here. I had previously been introduced to the breast cancer question while trying (..vainly!...) to teach myself Bayesian probability. Obviously, both approaches end up with the same result, but the graphic representing frequency is FAR simpler to grasp quickly

I like the 'frequency' approach presented here. I had previously been introduced to the breast cancer question while trying (..vainly!...) to teach myself Bayesian probability. Obviously, both approaches end up with the same result, but the graphic representing frequency is FAR simpler to grasp quickly and internalize. Looking forward to the remaining videos in this series.

The word "risk" is rooted in danger. But in practice, it's mostly a good thing. That's the underlying premise of our new show, RISK. This first episode took us to the world's first Center for Risk Literacy in Berlin and the flagship site of a now defunct criminal consumer electronics empire in New York

The word "risk" is rooted in danger. But in practice, it's mostly a good thing. That's the underlying premise of our new show, RISK. This first episode took us to the world's first Center for Risk Literacy in Berlin and the flagship site of a now defunct criminal consumer electronics empire in New York. In my research, I was most surprised to learn that the smallest shift in the way we present information can have life-or-death consequences– and that it's not common knowledge. I'm interested to hear any questions this video prompted, as well as what you'd like to see more of in all of our future shows.

While working on this video, I really started to think about how I take on risk every day. What started as something I only thought about in terms of personal finance quickly turned into ways I could apply this thinking to other parts of my life. Becoming more risk literate has made it much easier to

While working on this video, I really started to think about how I take on risk every day. What started as something I only thought about in terms of personal finance quickly turned into ways I could apply this thinking to other parts of my life. Becoming more risk literate has made it much easier to make all kinds of decisions, from the banal (should I bike to work if there’s a 30% chance of rain?) to the emotional (how can I approach a difficult conversation with my family?) I’m especially curious to hear how our viewers will apply the lessons of risk literacy outside of economics.

It’s great to see Risk Literacy being taught to key professions such as Doctors. I would be interested to hear more about how it is being taught to children too!

I wonder if risk taking is cultural? Here in Europe we have fewer startups than in US. Is that connected to us being more risk adverse? Fewer women than men start disruptive companies. Is that connected to risk taking?

1. Risks aren't always bad.

2. Knowing both the good and bad risks can help us achieve the former in decision-making situations.

3. Before you can even navigate through risk, you should fully understand its background and be able to digest it using frequencies and prerefarably not by confusing percentages.

That's all! Take a moment to reflect on your impact.