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Ana Kova

Good evening.

The unprecedented rise of TikTok

TikTok is China’s first global app. The short-format video app, owned by ByteDance, is the first Chinese app to become truly intertwined in the lives of its international users. Quartz’s Jane Li explains TikTok’s history, the company behind it, and its biggest challenge: scrutiny from regulators, especially in the US. ✦Quartz

How TikTok became China’s first global app

I'd hesitate to call Tik Tok a "global Chinese app" in the same way we view Instagram, Snapchat, and others given that Bytedance bought Musically. So, in a sense, TikTok was not an original Chinese idea. It's a repackaged American idea. We can give Bytedance fore recognizing a good idea and pushing it

I'd hesitate to call Tik Tok a "global Chinese app" in the same way we view Instagram, Snapchat, and others given that Bytedance bought Musically. So, in a sense, TikTok was not an original Chinese idea. It's a repackaged American idea. We can give Bytedance fore recognizing a good idea and pushing it forward but the IP didn't originate in China.

I became OBSESSED with TikTok as a users -- the content that's so funny is a rush of dopamine much more powerful than the validation of likes on Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook in my opinion. So I'm thrilled that QZ did a deep dive on the app, and the big businesses tied to it.

Love this!

Coronavirus cancellations

The list of world events cancelled due to coronavirus is getting longer. Fear over the spread of the disease has already disrupted schools and cruise ships. Now, it's coming for your social and professional calendar, too.Quartz

The growing list of world events canceled due to coronavirus

I’ve started to hear whispers of more cancelled research summits and conferences, one of which is focused on coronaviruses in general. While safety is key, I worry that the virus itself will impact research in so many areas. These conferences are where researchers get to know each other for key collaborations.

Light and Building held every 2 years in Frankfurt in March and attracting 100,000+ visitors globally has been cancelled and ‘rescheduled’ for September this year....this is the lighting industry’s largest trade fair.

Coronavirus update

How to deal with uncertainty like a poker champion

What’s happening in global markets?

The global consequences of EU subsidies

Mob violence in Delhi

Because of China...

Business in India

Should we fear automation?

…but automation doesn’t have to be scary. In fact, automating a job can result in more of those jobs. Studies have noted that there’s often a positive relationship between new technology and rising employment. Automation may even solve the problem of declining global productivity. ✦Quartz Membership

The optimist’s argument for how automation will impact jobs

Automation provides great opportunities to unlock untapped value that people can bring to business and society.

Organisations and communities need to bring holistic strategies that cover not only the technology, but the Change Management to manage the education and anxiety that this change brings.

Mindset

Automation provides great opportunities to unlock untapped value that people can bring to business and society.

Organisations and communities need to bring holistic strategies that cover not only the technology, but the Change Management to manage the education and anxiety that this change brings.

Mindset, openness, transparency and leadership are all essential to take societies forward to leverage automation.

It’s fascinating that this conversation seems to always revolve around will automation replace jobs or create more? Why do we never talk about the other possibility, that automation might one day replace the ~need~ for jobs as we currently understand them in a capitalist context? Peter Kropotkin’s “The

It’s fascinating that this conversation seems to always revolve around will automation replace jobs or create more? Why do we never talk about the other possibility, that automation might one day replace the ~need~ for jobs as we currently understand them in a capitalist context? Peter Kropotkin’s “The Conquest of Bread” makes a pretty interesting point that automation might free us from the drudgery of mechanical, repetitive, and uninspiring work, so that we might have more time to devote to play, or the act of creative and fulfilling “work.” Obviously current political and economic structures might make that reality a difficult one, but should it not at least be on the table? That one day automation might allow every single one of us to live more equitable, more empowered, more examined lives?

See you soon