Skip to navigationSkip to content
Heather Landy

Heather Landy

Editor at Quartz At Work
  • Observant readers will remember that Bill Gates had a pretty low opinion of Why Nations Fail. Its authors are back with another book that current Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella calls "fantastic."

  • I genuinely believe/hope we will someday look back at this time and see that it was the tipping point for when sustainable investing was finally ready to go mainstream. Making that kind of change, the kind that seemed so impossible at the outset, is perhaps the most important function of leadership.

  • When we launched Quartz At Work more than two years ago, we included a section (an obsession, in Quartz parlance) about the purpose of companies. It was apparent to us then that there had been a sea change in how companies, from mission-driven small businesses to corporate giants, were interacting with

    When we launched Quartz At Work more than two years ago, we included a section (an obsession, in Quartz parlance) about the purpose of companies. It was apparent to us then that there had been a sea change in how companies, from mission-driven small businesses to corporate giants, were interacting with societal issues and grappling with fitting their broader responsibilities into their strategy for maximizing profit. The answer is that those responsibilities often *don’t* neatly fit into that strategy; you need a new strategy.

    In the past year we have seen a swell of ideas about this, whether in the Business Roundtable’s updated statement on the purpose of the corporation or in the many thoughtful pieces on the topic that various experts have contributed to Quartz At Work. And then there are the books ... so many excellent, interesting, thought-provoking books that we are starting to see more and more of, about the promise and pitfalls of leading socially responsible businesses. We rounded up a few of our favorites for you as the capstone to the 2019 edition of our Perfect Company project, The New Purpose of Companies. Please enjoy.

  • Every now and then, my faith is restored that the markets really know how to do their job. I'll use this as a lesson tonight to teach my kid the basics about supply and demand, and about how actions have consequences.

  • My colleague Diksha Madhok wrote this about women in India, but most of it would apply to women in the United States, too. Our incremental measures aren’t getting us very far. If we want to build not only inclusive workplaces but societal infrastructure that makes it possible for more women to manage

    My colleague Diksha Madhok wrote this about women in India, but most of it would apply to women in the United States, too. Our incremental measures aren’t getting us very far. If we want to build not only inclusive workplaces but societal infrastructure that makes it possible for more women to manage the insane, joint demands of work and family—currently all smooshed into a precious few years when your career is at a particularly pivotal stage and your parenting responsibilities are at a particularly intense stage—then we might need to do something drastic. Here, Diksha rounds up some of the most revolutionary ideas about reinventing work and career. Pie in the sky? Surely. Doable? Absolutely.

  • The lives of working parents are complex indeed, and it's amazing to me that our political sphere is only just beginning to understand that. Our economy is one in which so many families, even quite privileged ones, are barely holding it all together. How much GDP is sacrificed when American parents are

    The lives of working parents are complex indeed, and it's amazing to me that our political sphere is only just beginning to understand that. Our economy is one in which so many families, even quite privileged ones, are barely holding it all together. How much GDP is sacrificed when American parents are busy scrambling daily to arrange suitable childcare or stressing about the cost or logistics of it?

    I have to keep reminding myself that these are relatively new mainstream issues for this country to confront (new, that is, for families in which the mother works outside the home as a choice versus a necessity; in some segments of society, the working-mom thing has been happening for generations, long before anyone ever heard of parental leave). But it's about time we start caring about the issue of childcare, and about time that our politicians start talking about it. I know some very stressed-out working parents on both sides of the aisle who will rather appreciate it.

  • Lauren truly loved Quartz, and Quartz truly loved her back. When we were matching the most recent pairs of mentors and mentees for Quartz Corps, our in-house mentorship program, she was ~by far~ the mentor most in demand; so many people requested her directly, and everyone on the committee handling the

    Lauren truly loved Quartz, and Quartz truly loved her back. When we were matching the most recent pairs of mentors and mentees for Quartz Corps, our in-house mentorship program, she was ~by far~ the mentor most in demand; so many people requested her directly, and everyone on the committee handling the pairings had someone in their group—whether in the newsroom or on one of our sales and marketing teams—whom they wanted to see mentored by her. It was such a testament to how beloved and admired she was here, and to how that admiration stretched across our entire company. I’m wearing my Quartz hoodie today in her honor.

  • The best tech news I've heard today: "Much like Amazon's newest Echo products, users can ask Google Assistant on the hub to turn off wifi access to specific devices connected to the network, meaning parents can wield a new level of tyranny over unruly kids and their connected devices."

  • Maybe Americans would do a better job of spreading democracy if we provided better examples of how to deal with dissent.

  • Net neutrality may carry the day yet. As Quartz’s Michael Coren notes, “This victory for the telecoms industry may have just actually delivered them into a hell they’ve tried to avoid for decades: a balkanized regulatory landscape even more restrictive than the one they just escaped.”