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Annabelle Timsit

Annabelle Timsit

Quartz
  • Coronavirus continues to bring down the world economy—this time, through dozens of canceled or postponed world events across every industry, from fashion to technology, sports, religion, and politics. Could the Olympics possibly be next?

  • The process of making adult friendships is hard, confusing, and emotionally draining — much like its close cousin, dating.

    I wrote about two pieces of advice social psychologists often give to those struggling through it, and how they both helped me when I moved from Washington DC to London.

  • After the 2008 recession and 2010 Eurozone debt crisis, many young people either couldn't find jobs or were fired from their jobs. Some never left home; others moved back in. The result is that a decade later, 40% of Europeans between 25 and 29 years old, who were teens when the crisis broke out, still

    After the 2008 recession and 2010 Eurozone debt crisis, many young people either couldn't find jobs or were fired from their jobs. Some never left home; others moved back in. The result is that a decade later, 40% of Europeans between 25 and 29 years old, who were teens when the crisis broke out, still live with at least one parent. And that number doesn't even tell the full story, because proportions varied wildly between countries: While only 4% of Danes between 25 and 29 still lived at home in 2017, 75.4% of their Croatian peers did.

  • Europe is the region of the world with the fastest-aging population, and it needs social care workers to look after this growing sector of the population. But the UK's new, post-Brexit immigration plan strips the sector from a major recruitment pool: Unskilled workers from the EU. The plan, which was

    Europe is the region of the world with the fastest-aging population, and it needs social care workers to look after this growing sector of the population. But the UK's new, post-Brexit immigration plan strips the sector from a major recruitment pool: Unskilled workers from the EU. The plan, which was released today, will award points to applicants based on their professional and academic qualifications, skills, and job prospects in the UK. With no job offer on the ground or PhD in a STEM skill, it's highly unlikely that an applicant would get a visa to work in the UK after Dec. 31. In my piece, I talk to representatives of the social care sector what this will mean for them.

  • Here is a sample of what people in Birmingham told me about HS2, Britain's future high-speed railway:

    “First it’s off, then it’s back on, then it’s off, and then it’s back on again.”

    “I can’t see them justifying spending all that money."

    "I question why we need it if I’m honest.”

    “Maybe by the time

    Here is a sample of what people in Birmingham told me about HS2, Britain's future high-speed railway:

    “First it’s off, then it’s back on, then it’s off, and then it’s back on again.”

    “I can’t see them justifying spending all that money."

    "I question why we need it if I’m honest.”

    “Maybe by the time HS2 is done, I’m dead.”

    The UK's second city is the first stop on HS2's tracks, and it stands to benefit more than most from the renewed political attention and investment that HS2 has promised to deliver. In fact, it's already started to see benefits.

    But on the streets, residents either don't know what HS2 is, or are worried about costs and delays—at best, they're cautiously optimistic. Where is the disconnect coming from?

    "If I was going to make a challenge to HS2, I would say that it has been very poorly communicated from the outset," answers Laura Shoaf, managing director of Transport for West Midlands. "I don’t think that, to date, the benefits have been clearly articulated.”

  • High-level talks over an investment agreement between the EU and China that have been more than six years in the making already weren't going very well. But that was before the Coronavirus outbreak, which has relegated relations with the EU to the bottom of Chinese officials’ agendas and made it both

    High-level talks over an investment agreement between the EU and China that have been more than six years in the making already weren't going very well. But that was before the Coronavirus outbreak, which has relegated relations with the EU to the bottom of Chinese officials’ agendas and made it both logistically and politically complicated to stick to the original timeline for the Comprehensive Agreement on Investment, as it’s officially known.

    Experts say there's a high chance the coronavirus will disrupt a series of key events for the future of the EU-China relationship that were set to take place in China and in European countries in early 2020. Midlands Engine, the host of this year’s UK-China Regional Leaders Summit, has already announced they would postpone the event.

    While a representative of the Delegation of the European Union to China told me that no high-level meetings or summits had been canceled yet, he did say they “have suspended all non-essential missions to China” until Feb. 16 and “recommended that all non-essential visits and meetings coming from China are to be temporarily postponed.”

    “The situation is obviously evolving day by day.”

  • It would be difficult to overstate how important Xana was to our newsroom and to the soul and spirit of Quartz. She played a hand in hiring almost every single reporter that now writes the stories our readers enjoy; every developer that has built this app into what it is now; every sales and business

    It would be difficult to overstate how important Xana was to our newsroom and to the soul and spirit of Quartz. She played a hand in hiring almost every single reporter that now writes the stories our readers enjoy; every developer that has built this app into what it is now; every sales and business person that does the hard work that allows Quartz to thrive. To say that she will be missed sounds trite, but it is so very, very true.

  • Well-known British private school groups like Harrow, Wellington, Dulwich, and Hurtwood House, make a lot of money in China by either running sister campuses there or by taking on "consulting" roles to co-manage bilingual schools with Chinese businesses. But a recent crackdown on international private

    Well-known British private school groups like Harrow, Wellington, Dulwich, and Hurtwood House, make a lot of money in China by either running sister campuses there or by taking on "consulting" roles to co-manage bilingual schools with Chinese businesses. But a recent crackdown on international private schools by the Chinese government caused a slowdown in this niche market last year. Experts told me that things will pick back up, and that when they do, it'll be worth looking at where in the country these schools choose to go next, because they act like a harbinger of the Chinese central government’s plan for economic development.

  • Residents of Bosnia and Herzegovina are choking on unsafe, polluted air this winter. That's not uncommon for one of the most polluted countries in Europe — but this time, people are protesting. They claim the government isn't doing enough to prevent air pollution (an accusation backed up by a wealth

    Residents of Bosnia and Herzegovina are choking on unsafe, polluted air this winter. That's not uncommon for one of the most polluted countries in Europe — but this time, people are protesting. They claim the government isn't doing enough to prevent air pollution (an accusation backed up by a wealth of research done by the European Union). And there's another problem: As the air gets more and more toxic, Bosnia's government is inviting Chinese investors to fund expansions or construction projects of coal power plants.

  • This is an absolutely incredible feat of reporting by a talented group of journalists that includes one of our own here at Quartz. But what’s important to remember is that Dos Santos is far from alone — the global financial system allows and even encourages this type of high-level fraud and wealth diversion

    This is an absolutely incredible feat of reporting by a talented group of journalists that includes one of our own here at Quartz. But what’s important to remember is that Dos Santos is far from alone — the global financial system allows and even encourages this type of high-level fraud and wealth diversion, which benefit large (mostly American) consulting, auditing, and lobbying firms.