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Chris Look

Chris Look

consultant at CL Consulting
  • I would agree that in the US, a good job of has been making “socialism” a pejorative term and virtually (but erroneously!) synonymous with “communism”. Most other western democracies have multi-party systems (vs just 2 in US) that include reasonably strong “socialist” parties (eg NDP in Canada, Labor

    I would agree that in the US, a good job of has been making “socialism” a pejorative term and virtually (but erroneously!) synonymous with “communism”. Most other western democracies have multi-party systems (vs just 2 in US) that include reasonably strong “socialist” parties (eg NDP in Canada, Labor in UK, etc.). These parties may or may not be the governing party but they act as a balance to ensure some degree of representation of a large fraction of the population.

    As wealth is increasingly concentrated in fewer individuals in the US, those left out and/or who find value in “non-capitalist” pursuits (eg teachers, nurses, healthcare workers, daycare providers, park rangers, artists, waiters, etc.) will search for someone to represent their interests.

    In this context, the rise of “socialist” policies is not surprising. Yes, this will almost certainly mean higher taxation on the well-to-do but, on the upside, better income distribution, better infrastructure and a healthier and happier population are likely to produce broader buy-in for the political system. How do you put a value on those?

  • I like the 'frequency' approach presented here. I had previously been introduced to the breast cancer question while trying (..vainly!...) to teach myself Bayesian probability. Obviously, both approaches end up with the same result, but the graphic representing frequency is FAR simpler to grasp quickly

    I like the 'frequency' approach presented here. I had previously been introduced to the breast cancer question while trying (..vainly!...) to teach myself Bayesian probability. Obviously, both approaches end up with the same result, but the graphic representing frequency is FAR simpler to grasp quickly and internalize. Looking forward to the remaining videos in this series.