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Pramod Mathew

Pramod Mathew

Desk Editor at Quartz

All things can be explained.

  • With its uncompromising stand on AGR dues, the government is being too eager to fill its coffers.

    Vodafone Idea is a golden goose that pays over $1 billion in annual spectrum fees. If it folds up, like its nearly dozen peers, the government will have one less revenue source.

    It may make long-term

    With its uncompromising stand on AGR dues, the government is being too eager to fill its coffers.

    Vodafone Idea is a golden goose that pays over $1 billion in annual spectrum fees. If it folds up, like its nearly dozen peers, the government will have one less revenue source.

    It may make long-term sense for the government to part with some of the AGR dues. At the very least, it can allow a more flexible timeframe for telcos to repay the liabilities.

  • Zomato and Uber Eats have a combined market share of 52% of gross order volumes, while Swiggy has a 43% share. With this acquisition, the market has formally consolidated.

    Uber is also confronting the responsibilities that come with being a publicly-listed company. With its shares still trading below

    Zomato and Uber Eats have a combined market share of 52% of gross order volumes, while Swiggy has a 43% share. With this acquisition, the market has formally consolidated.

    Uber is also confronting the responsibilities that come with being a publicly-listed company. With its shares still trading below the IPO list price, there will be pressure from shareholders to pursue profitability, and consequently exit loss-making investments such as the food delivery business.

  • Juxtapose this with India's boycott of palm oil purchases from Malaysia, and it becomes clear that political agenda is getting in the way of good economics.

    Atleast the US-China trade war has economics at its core. India's snub to foreign firms and sovereign countries based on political considerations is just bad economics.

  • Rising inflation, fuelled by higher food prices, has now tied the hands of the RBI, which went on a rate-cut spree in 2019 to aid growth. This makes the task of reviving the economy more onerous.

    The government will have to let go of its fiscal deficit targets and increase its expenditure. Low fiscal

    Rising inflation, fuelled by higher food prices, has now tied the hands of the RBI, which went on a rate-cut spree in 2019 to aid growth. This makes the task of reviving the economy more onerous.

    The government will have to let go of its fiscal deficit targets and increase its expenditure. Low fiscal deficit is an over-rated parameter. Maybe prolonged periods of high deficit will harm the government's balance sheet. However, in times of a slowdown, it is meaningless to set such strict targets.

    Trying to stave off the global financial crisis of 2008, finance minister Pranab Mukherjee had allowed fiscal deficit to widen.

    Hard times call for harsh measures.

  • The first wave of the craft beer revolution was the emergence of brew pubs. As the microbreweries mastered the art of bottling, then came the age of bottled craft beer such as Bira 91. Now, as the corporate breweries hop on the bandwagon, the niche market may be poised for growth.

  • For much of the period after liberalisation, the Indian economy was fuelled by the phenomenon of "jobless growth." Services, not manufacturing or agriculture, contributed to the runaway growth.

    The chinks in this economic model have now become conspicuous. Due to stark income inequalities, unemployment

    For much of the period after liberalisation, the Indian economy was fuelled by the phenomenon of "jobless growth." Services, not manufacturing or agriculture, contributed to the runaway growth.

    The chinks in this economic model have now become conspicuous. Due to stark income inequalities, unemployment, and regional disparities in development, the country seems to have exhausted its growth potential.

    Investing in a well-fed, well-skilled, and healthy population alone can fire all cylinders of the economy. GDP numbers are, after all, meaningless unless the fruits of growth trickle down.

    Like they say: "growth for growth's own sake is the ideology of the cancer cell."

  • It is pertinent to note that this is the tax collected in December for transactions done in November— a festive month. This might make the numbers seem rosier than it is. Ultimately, the GST receipts don't seem to be on track to meet FY20 budgetary targets.

  • It's tempting to read Maruti's 3.9% growth in December as a possible bottoming out of the sales rut. However, it must be noted that the company's growth in the month came on the back of a 10.2% growth in exports. Domestic sales growth was muted at 2.4%. There is no clear sign therefore of a sustained

    It's tempting to read Maruti's 3.9% growth in December as a possible bottoming out of the sales rut. However, it must be noted that the company's growth in the month came on the back of a 10.2% growth in exports. Domestic sales growth was muted at 2.4%. There is no clear sign therefore of a sustained recovery for the auto sector

    If there is a revival, though, in auto sales in 2020 it might be led by Maruti. Most of its new models have met BS VI norms and popular Vitara Brezza's petrol model is set for launch this year.

  • The gap between India and China is stark. To sustain the ballooning population India will have to clock much higher rates of growth. The next generation will pay the price of our follies.

  • Because of the debt it has amassed, Air India must be divested. But no investor will put his money in an airline that's neck deep in debt. The Indian government therefore is in a perfect Catch-22 situation.

    It is difficult to favour running a loss-making carrier in economically stressful times such

    Because of the debt it has amassed, Air India must be divested. But no investor will put his money in an airline that's neck deep in debt. The Indian government therefore is in a perfect Catch-22 situation.

    It is difficult to favour running a loss-making carrier in economically stressful times such as these, yet shutting down Air India will send the sector into a tailspin. The government must find ways to divest the carrier while keeping it airborne.